Wedding Bouquet Ideas

Why does a bride carry a bouquet?

Having a bouquet of flowers to hold and admire on one of the most important days of her life is a dream for every woman, and not just because she gets to wear them, display them at home, or receive them as a gift. The day of her wedding is one of the most significant and special of her life. Today's bride, whether she's having a lavish, extravagant wedding or a small, intimate ceremony in the family yard, cannot do without her bridal bouquet. Flowers at a wedding aren't only there to make the venue seem pretty and provide a touch of romance; there are more meaningful reasons for their inclusion.

It has been a long-standing custom for the bride to arrive at the ceremony with a bouquet of flowers. In Ancient Rome, brides traditionally wore or carried flower garlands as a symbol of new beginnings, loyalty, and the possibility of having children. It was widely held in the Middle Ages that the use of strongly scented herbs and spices might help protect one from evil spirits, bad fortune, and disease, as well as mask unpleasant body odour. Wedding bouquets were often crafted from herbs rather than flowers, with dill being a staple of many of these arrangements. Eating dill at the reception was said to heighten the bride and groom's sexual desire because of the herb's reputation as the "herb of lust."

Including flowers in the bride's bouquet is a tradition that is widely believed to have originated in the Victorian era and continue to this day. The modern bridal bouquet can be traced back to Queen Victoria, who carried a tussie-mussie to her wedding to Prince Albert. Moss and orange bloom are nestled in a filigree holder inside a tiny, circular clutch of flowers known as a tussie-mussie. It was typical for Victorian era lovers to show their affection for one another by giving bouquets of flowers. As time went on, the custom of exchanging flowers—each of which had its own special meaning—became deeply ingrained in Western culture. Because of this profound emotional connection, floral arrangements have become standard at weddings. Many brides place special significance on the choice of wedding flowers because of the meanings associated with different types of blooms and because the bride traditionally keeps some of those flowers for the rest of her life.

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It's hard to envision walking down the aisle without a floral bouquet. But, seriously, what are you planning to do with your hands? Since it is your wedding, you can choose to carry a bouquet if you like (or not). The only valid justification is the one you accept.

But for the sake of self-knowledge, let's talk about some of the odd and, at times, cringe-inducing reasons why women have traditionally carried bouquets. Not everything about wedding traditions is rosy, though. Literally.

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There Must Be a Bouquet

The bride is supposed to carry a bouquet of flowers as part of the ritual. But have you ever given thought to the symbolism of brides carrying bouquets at weddings? As with many other customs, bouquets have a long and storied history that dates back to antiquity. In ancient Greece, brides traditionally carried bouquets containing a variety of spices and fresh herbs. Fragrant bouquets including garlic were common during that time, as were bouquets containing a variety of other plants. The strong fragrance released by these bouquets was said to dissuade bad spirits from wishing the newlyweds harm.

The ancient Romans, who were instrumental in shaping modern wedding rituals, also adopted this practise. Have you ever pondered the significance of the third finger on the left hand, where wedding bands are customarily worn? An ancient Roman misconception said that a vein in this finger led directly to the heart. They wore wedding bands on these fingers as a symbol of their commitment to one another. Here in the modern day, we have carried on this practise.

Bridal flowers were traditionally given even in the Middle Ages. Bouquets evolved in purpose during this time, but remained mostly made of spices and herbs rather than flowers. Women in the Middle Ages thought that the flowers they carried in their bouquets not only protected them from harm, but also worked as a sort of aphrodisiac to promote fertility in the marriage.

It wasn't until the Victorian era in England in the 1800s that bouquets composed of flowers instead of herbs and spices became popular. Queen Victoria was the pioneering bride who did this. When she wed Prince Albert in 1840, she opted for a bouquet of fresh flowers instead of the traditional bouquet of herbs and spices. Many people thought that since deodorant was not widely accessible at the time, this choice was made to hide the smell of sweat and other fluids.

To Mask You Know, the Bride’s Scent

Here's a dirty little secret: brides in the 15th century were notorious for having a very distinct odour. So, they gave out an offensive odour. The Huffington Post claims that June is the most popular month for weddings because most people have returned from their annual holidays in May. Most people take their holidays in May, so that could be why. Men only got one (and here you were thinking your problems were serious), and women waited until the very end to jump in the pool. After filling a large tub with hot water, the household head would soak in it, then any male members of the household, then the humble and impoverished women who stayed there, and finally the child would receive the stale water that was left over. The adage "Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater" originated in this situation. Perhaps you have already deduced this.

Because of this, June is a popular month for weddings, as the newlyweds and their guests (especially the guys, who probably got the hot, clean bathwater) will still smell very great a month later. The rationale for setting weddings for the month of June was such. To cover up any unpleasant odours they might be exuding, brides have taken to carrying fragrant bouquets to the wedding. Avoiding public shame motivated this action. Swoon?

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In Order to Drive Away Evil Spirits

One of the oldest and most widespread customs related to bridal bouquets is using them as a protection against evil spirits. The bouquets in this case were not overpowering in scent due to the presence of strong-smelling flowers, but rather due to the usage of exceedingly pungent herbs like spices, dill, and perhaps even a great deal of garlic and chives. That is to say, the bouquets didn't stink due to the usage of overpoweringly fragrant blooms. If you look up and notice a cooked potato slowly making its way down the aisle, you are not alone.

This theory can be looked at from two different angles. One school of thinking in old folklore held that the strong odours might drive away evil spirits and safeguard against bad luck. Garlic and dill, two herbs with natural medical characteristics, were held over the nose and mouth by the people of that time in an effort to stay alive. However, it's possible that may as a practise dates back to the time of the Plague or at least gained popularity at that terrible time.

In Order to Stimulate Sexual Desire Between the Contented Couple

Wedding flowers in Roman times were very different from modern bouquets. Flowers were used instead, as a symbol of rebirth and fertilty. As the practise of tossing a bridal bouquet to the guests became popular again, edible aphrodisiacs like dill (which served a double purpose) and marigold were introduced into the arrangements.

To Convey a Pleasant Message

This argument for the wedding bouquet, which originated in Victorian times, is probably the one that is most similar to the present rationale behind carrying flowers when we are married: because they signify something important. It was during the Victorian era that floriography, also known as the language of flowers, came into existence. Floriography is a system in which particular types of flowers have specific meanings that are associated with them. During the Victorian era, these flowers held a particularly significant significance. If a groom wanted to send a lovely, coded message to his bride, he would choose a bouquet utilising flowers that represented his message of love. This would be done in the form of a flower arrangement. In a similar manner, brides would select flowers to convey their feelings to their future husbands through the course of their wedding ceremony.

This custom is still followed by some brides while selecting flowers for their weddings in the modern era. Do you wish to convey your adoration? Take for example a white camellia. Do you want to have a happy marriage? You should go with peony. Do you want to tell your significant other that they "dazzle" you with their charms? The ranunculus is a flower that never disappoints. Indeed, this is by far the most important function that bridal bouquets provide.

To Show Love

This justification better fits the way we currently view bridal bouquets. In Victorian times it was usual to convey your lover notes through flowers. In floriography, the language of flowers, each blossom represents a different idea. Due to this romantic link, flowers become a new wedding tradition which we eagerly accept.

In Order to Secure the Bride

Several centuries ago, guests at weddings believed they could share in the bride's good fortune if they managed to rip off a swatch of the bride's dress. As a result, brides started tossing their bouquets into the crowd in the hopes that the eager guests would chase after the bouquets rather than the bride. The bride and groom would dash to their bedroom as soon as the bouquet was tossed about to avoid being trampled. Thanks to the widespread adoption of this novel custom, brides no longer have to worry about their wedding guests tearing their dresses to shreds.

Options for Wedding Bouquets

Not every bride needs to carry a traditional round bouquet; there are many other options that are equally lovely. The occasion calls for gorgeous and appropriate floral arrangements, and some good choices include cascading shapes, asymmetrical designs, and little posy-like bouquets. It's possible that the components used are significantly more intricate than the usual roses and peonies. Floral arrangements that use exotic blooms, preserved foliage, and nontraditional colour palettes make bold fashion statements.

If you really want to go against the grain, you can walk down the aisle holding nothing but a single flower, your pet on a leash, or your parents' hands. Lanterns, floral wreaths, paper flowers, and bold necklaces and dramatic headpieces made from real flowers are just some of the creative alternatives to the traditional bridal bouquet.

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A Beautiful Bride in June

For as long as anyone can remember, June has been the most popular month for weddings. Today's couples often choose June for their date nights because the month of June often has mild temperatures and clear skies. For an altogether other reason, mediaeval times saw June as the most popular month for weddings. There was a time when May was set aside as the annual bathing month for the average person. So that they could have a stress-free wedding day, the couple opted to tie the knot as soon as feasible. The bouquet of aromatic flowers added to the bride's natural beauty and youthfulness. Doesn't that put a whole new spin on the phrase "love is in the air?"

Although it wasn't the sole motivating factor, the need to cover up body odour played a significant role in the establishment of bouquets as a cultural norm for brides. If you're curious about the bouquet's backstory, you'll have to do some digging. The brides of yesteryear typically walked down the aisle with a bunch of flowers (or other objects) in her hand.

The bride's bouquet is often misunderstood as merely an accessory to be used as part of the bride's ensemble and the wedding's aesthetic. While this may be the case now, in the past people carried bouquets for a wide variety of reasons, not all of which were particularly sentimental. We can't be sure of the origins of the practise, but with time it has developed into the sophisticated custom that is still followed today. You will no longer have to answer the question "where did the bouquet come from?"

Carrying a bouquet can have as much or as little meaning for modern women as they like, and they might do it for a wide range of reasons. When it's time to start looking for the perfect bridal bouquet. We provide a wide variety of fresh flower selections for the bride who wants to do everything herself, as well as many options for the bride who prefers handcrafted arrangements.

The ancient traditions, however charming they may have seemed at the time, have mostly been forgotten in the modern era, and today's brides select flowers for their bouquets mainly on the aesthetic value of their colours, scents, and forms. The bride's bouquet is the single most important decorative element of her wedding. The flowers the bride chooses to accessorise with are an integral part of her bridal look and an opportunity for her to express her personal style and preference.

Wedding Bouquet Ideas

Conclusion

The bride carrying a bouquet of flowers has been a tradition at weddings for centuries. Bridal flower garlands were a symbol of new beginnings for Roman brides. Queen Victoria is credited with popularising the modern bridal bouquet. The history of the bouquet is rich and ancient, stretching back to ancient Greece. Spices and herbs were common components of bridal bouquets in ancient Greece.

Flowers were considered aphrodisiacs and talismans by mediaeval women. Since most people have returned from their annual vacations by June, that is the month that is most commonly used for weddings. Now, it's common practise for brides to bring scented bouquets to the ceremony as a means of masking any lingering body odour. When she married Prince Albert in 1840, Queen Victoria was the first bride to do so. Strong-smelling flowers were not used in Roman bouquets, so the bouquets did not have an overpowering scent.

Aphrodisiac herbs like marigold and dill were incorporated into Victorian floral arrangements. Flowers were the typical method of communication between lovers in Victorian times. This justification is more in line with how we currently view bridal bouquets. It's not necessary for every bride to use a round bouquet, and there are plenty of other beautiful choices. Cascading shapes, asymmetrical designs, and small posy-like bouquets are all suitable and beautiful options for the event in question.

June has always been the most popular month for weddings, as far back as anyone can remember. The mediaeval bride carried a bouquet of flowers down the aisle. A major factor in the development of bouquets was the requirement to mask body odour. Modern women may choose to carry a bouquet for a variety of reasons, some of which may or may not have anything to do with flowers. The bride's choice of flowers is a chance for her to show her unique sense of style and complement her bridal ensemble.

Content Summary

  • The day of her wedding is one of the most significant and special of her life.
  • It has been a long-standing custom for the bride to arrive at the ceremony with a bouquet of flowers.
  • "Including flowers in the bride's bouquet is a tradition that is widely believed to have originated in the Victorian era and continue to this day.
  • The modern bridal bouquet can be traced back to Queen Victoria, who carried a tussie-mussie to her wedding to Prince Albert.
  • Since it is your wedding, you can choose to carry a bouquet if you like (or not).
  • But for the sake of self-knowledge, let's talk about some of the odd and, at times, cringe-inducing reasons why women have traditionally carried bouquets.
  • There Must Be a BouquetThe bride is supposed to carry a bouquet of flowers as part of the ritual.
  • As with many other customs, bouquets have a long and storied history that dates back to antiquity.
  • In ancient Greece, brides traditionally carried bouquets containing a variety of spices and fresh herbs.
  • Bridal flowers were traditionally given even in the Middle Ages.
  • It wasn't until the Victorian era in England in the 1800s that bouquets composed of flowers instead of herbs and spices became popular.
  • Because of this, June is a popular month for weddings, as the newlyweds and their guests (especially the guys, who probably got the hot, clean bathwater) will still smell very great a month later.
  • The rationale for setting weddings for the month of June was such.
  • To cover up any unpleasant odours they might be exuding, brides have taken to carrying fragrant bouquets to the wedding.
  • One of the oldest and most widespread customs related to bridal bouquets is using them as a protection against evil spirits.
  • One school of thinking in old folklore held that the strong odours might drive away evil spirits and safeguard against bad luck.
  • The ranunculus is a flower that never disappoints.
  • For as long as anyone can remember, June has been the most popular month for weddings.
  • The bouquet of aromatic flowers added to the bride's natural beauty and youthfulness.
  • The bride's bouquet is often misunderstood as merely an accessory to be used as part of the bride's ensemble and the wedding's aesthetic.
  • While this may be the case now, in the past people carried bouquets for a wide variety of reasons, not all of which were particularly sentimental.
  • Carrying a bouquet can have as much or as little meaning for modern women as they like, and they might do it for a wide range of reasons.
  • When it's time to start looking for the perfect bridal bouquet.
  • The ancient traditions, however charming they may have seemed at the time, have mostly been forgotten in the modern era, and today's brides select flowers for their bouquets mainly on the aesthetic value of their colours, scents, and forms.
  • The bride's bouquet is the single most important decorative element of her wedding.

FAQs About the Bride’s Boquet

This part can be overwhelming, but a lot of the times the kinds of flowers you choose comes down to three things: personal preference, the colour theme of your wedding, and the time of year it's taking place. Here's a breakdown of the types that tend to be the most popular.

Traditional, loose and organic, basic, or even non-floral bouquets are all appropriate; the key is to find one that the bride and groom are both happy with. It is important that the bride's bouquet is not too enormous or too tiny for her; otherwise, the bride may feel like she is being smothered by or unable to fully appreciate either the beauty or the symbolism of the flowers.

Owens says the final design of the bouquet has a lot to do with the design of the gown. "A sleek, clean-lined gown perhaps calls for a more minimal bouquet, so as not to overpower the dress," she says. "Likewise, a larger ball gown might be able to handle a larger, more elaborate bouquet."

It typically ranges anywhere from $150-$350, but that doesn't include flowers for everyone else in the wedding party. You can learn more about those additional floral costs here.

Most commonly, brides opt to have their 'maids carry a slightly smaller version of their bouquet, sometimes designating a certain flower to appear in the bridal bouquet only. You could also choose a variety of blooms for your bouquet and then have each bridesmaid carry a single bloom or a few stems of a single variety. Another great option is to play with colour, either adding tone to your bouquet or having one be quite bright while the other is more muted.

If you're attached to your bouquet, look into options for having it preserved. You can press a few of the blooms in a book, dry the flowers and place them in a shadow box, or have a professional preserve it for you. Otherwise, stick the stems in a vase, and pop by your local florist for flower food to add every few days to keep the flowers alive as long as possible. Then relish in the pictures from your photographer.

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