What Are The Rituals In Jewish Weddings?

There are several symbolic traditions in a Jewish wedding that highlight the importance of the couple's commitment to one other and to the Jewish community.

If you want to know more about what to expect during a Jewish wedding, read on! Listed below are, in a rabbi's opinion, the most frequently asked questions: 

How Should I Dress For A Jewish Wedding? 

This is the first question women will ask. It's your first query regarding anything and everything, but especially this place. But if you're a man, you could still be curious.

The ladies often ask, "Is it too much to wear all black?"

 You can even ask if it's required in some groups. Although the hue is making a strong comeback, classic black will never go out of style.

Not acceptable are sleeveless shirts, short skirts (most visitors will have their knees covered), or revealing clothes (most guests will have their collarbones covered). But there is a garment known as a "shell" that you should be aware of. It's a simple, sophisticated top that can be worn beneath nearly everything in your collection thanks to its long sleeves and scoop neck.

Your basic black suit is good, gentlemen. Tuxedos are a rarity in Jewish weddings. Wear a respectable necktie, and you'll be set. The yarmulke, however, complicates matters for everyone. For an Orthodox wedding, a yarmulke is a necessary accessory. Your choice of yarmulke is a matter of personal preference; but, if you're the kind who likes to fit in, you may want to leave the satin one at home and instead take note of what the locals favour.

Women traditionally wear shoulder-covering dresses and males wear Kippahs or Yarmulke for the ritual.

Where should I sit?

Separate sections of the church may be used for guests at some Orthodox weddings. There are even those that have a mechitza! (this may be more for the dancing than for the seating, depending on the crowd). Some will be coed, while others will have separate sections for men and women. There will be completely integrated seating at others.

Because it is forbidden by Jewish law for people of different sexes to dance together, dance will always be segregated. However, this may be done in a variety of ways, from using a mechitza to just drawing different circles.

Which Seat Should I Take?

Separate sections of the church may be used for guests at some Orthodox weddings. Depending on the gathering, some who have a mechitza may use it more for dancing than seating. Some will have separate sections for men and women, while others will sit both sexes together.

We have never seen mixed seating at an Orthodox chuppah. Conventionally, at Orthodox Jewish weddings, the male guests will stand while the female guests will sit on opposite sides of the room. A partition separates the male and female guests at an ultra-Orthodox wedding.

Due to the nature of Jewish law, which prohibits mixed dancing, dancing will always be segregated. This can be done in a variety of ways, from using a mechitza to merely drawing a line in the middle of the circle.

Do I Need To Bring A Gift?

No one We seen at an Orthodox wedding has ever brought a gift, and We can't imagine why not. They either leave them somewhere beforehand or pick them up later.

Some brides make a registry, but many do not, leaving you to fend for yourself. Acceptable check amounts include the "chai" or $18. This is the greatest option for the couple so that they can avoid having to ship any of their belongings to Israel. Alternatively, kitchenware, cookbooks, crystal, or kiddush cups are acceptable alternatives. Although it may seem obvious, We do not advise using a mezuzah cover, as most of them are not large enough to accommodate a kosher scroll.

Jewish Wedding Customs

You'll learn more about the meaning behind these joyful and beautiful Jewish wedding customs.

Kabbalat Panim

They are treated like kings and queens on their wedding day. Kabbalat panim, literally "the receiving of faces," is the first step in a Jewish wedding. The bride and groom each host a reception for their guests, called Hachnasat Kallah and Chosen's Tish, respectively, as if they were royalty. The bride is greeted by her female guests, who are there to tend to her every want, as she sits atop a throne-like chair. Male guests toast the Chosen at the Tish, literally the "groom's table," during the wedding ceremony. The groom is attempting to read from the Torah, but the guests are singing and yelling over him. The goal is to maintain a cheerful atmosphere. Looking for the ultimate Wedding Reception Venue in Melbourne? Look no further, Vogue Ballroom is here. 

Chatan and kallah traditionally don't see each other for a week leading up to the wedding. This adds to the thrill and expectation of the occasion. Consequently, the chatan and kallah do not combine their greetings with one another until after the wedding ceremony. Kabbalat Panim is the name for this.

According to Jewish custom, they are compared to a monarch and a queen. Guests will surround the chatan as he sits on a throne as the kallah sings and drinks toasts.

Ashkenazi custom calls for the bride's mother and the groom's mother to smash a plate at the wedding reception. The purpose for this is to emphasise the gravity of the commitment: just as a broken plate can never be fixed completely, so can a shattered relationship.

Aufruf

The Yiddish word for "call" is "aufruf," which means "up" in English. The aliyah is a blessing given to the bride and husband before the wedding ceremony. Immediately following the aliyah, the rabbi will recite a blessing known as misheberach, and at this point, it is traditional for members of the congregation to throw candy at the newlyweds as a symbol of good luck and a sweet married life.

Breaking A Plate

When the engagement ceremony was held as a distinct event in the past, the breaking of a plate by the two mothers represented their acceptance of the terms of the engagement. It's a prelude to the actual breaking of the glass during the wedding ceremony, which also represents the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem.

Fasting

Due to the significance of the wedding day as a day of forgiveness, some couples choose to observe a fast on their wedding day in the same manner as they would on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. The wedding ceremony will mark the beginning of the fast, which the pair plans to observe until their first meal together.

The Tish

The Jewish wedding ceremony begins with the tish, which is Yiddish for a table, at the groom's home. When the groom tries to give a talk about the Torah reading for the week, his male relatives and friends start to heckle and interrupt. In the meantime, the bride's female friends and family are entertaining her in another room. Traditionalist and Reform churches allow the bride and husband to take turns leading the tish.

Ketubah Signing

The ketubah is the Jewish marriage contract symbolising the duties of the man to his bride. It lays out the terms he'll uphold in the marriage, the bride's rights and protections, and the procedure to be followed in the event of a divorce. Ketubahs are legal documents in Jewish culture; as such, they do not include any references to God or religious blessings for the marriage. It is customary for the ketubah to be signed by the bride and groom in the presence of two witnesses before the wedding and then read aloud to the guests.

Bedeken

Bedeken, which means "checking," is an age-old activity with roots in the Bible. According to one myth, the trouble started when Jacob's father-in-law Laban fooled him into marrying Leah by having her come to the wedding already veiled. He didn't realise she wasn't Rachel until after the wedding was over. The meeting of Isaac and Rebecca is the first time in the Torah that we hear of romantic feelings between two people. Rebecca's sense of modesty and humility causes her to decrease her aura and attractiveness to the point where Isaac trips over her veil and falls to the ground. If the bride will be wearing a veil, her groom will do so either before or after the processional.

The bedeken is not performed at weddings for Sephardic Jews (Jews from Spain and the Iberian Peninsula). Alternatively, the wedding couple's palms may be decorated with henna at a celebration held a week before the ceremony. These identifiers help everyone find them on the big day, and some people even believe they ward off the "evil eye" as they celebrate.

The groom traditionally performs the bedeken or veiling as they stand before the bride to sign the ketubah. In response to her beauty, he covers her face with his gaze. This represents both his affection for her on account of her intrinsic attractiveness and the fact that the two of them continue to maintain their unique identities even as husband and wife. There is also the biblically inspired legend that Jacob was deceived into marrying her sister of the lady he loved because she was veiled. The possibility of deception is eliminated if the bridegroom does the veiling himself.

The Walk To The Chuppah

The chuppah (wedding canopy) symbolises God's protection over the couple and their new life together. Family and friends are always welcome in the couple's home, symbolised by the absence of walls and the presence of loved ones under the chuppah. The chuppah can be created out of anything the couple finds meaningful, such as a prayer shawl (tallit) or a handmade quilt. The poles on which the chuppah is typically mounted require the assistance of four people, usually friends or family members of the marriage. Check out Vogue Ballroom Wedding Venue for your ultimate wedding reception.

The order of the processional and recessional in Jewish ceremonies differs slightly from that of non-Jewish ceremonies. Both of the groom's parents traditionally lead them along the aisle to a chuppah, the canopy under which Jewish wedding vows are exchanged. The bride's parents and bridal party come next. The chuppah is a traditional Jewish wedding canopy under which the bride, groom, and rabbi stand during the ceremony.

Vows Under The Chuppah

The chuppah, an open-sided canopy that represents the house of the newlyweds, is where the ceremony takes place. From the time of the Jewish people's nomadic existence in the desert, this building was inspired by the tent of Abraham and Sarah, who were known for their hospitality. The design of the chuppah is not mandated by Jewish law. We've had the honour of assisting brides with the chuppah's design and floral arrangements, and we love seeing how each chuppah comes to reflect the unique style of the bride who commissioned it.

A chuppah is a four-sided canopy used in Jewish wedding ceremonies to represent the couple's future dwelling as husband and wife. During the ceremony, friends and family of the couple may hold up the chuppah's four posts as a symbol of their commitment to the couple's new life together. However, sometimes it takes the form of a freestanding building decked out in floral arrangements. The tallit, or prayer shawl, of one of the bride and groom, or a member of their families, is often used to create the canopy.

Circling

Under the chuppah, an Ashkenazi bride will perform three or seven complete rotations around her new husband. There are many who believe this is done to erect a magical shield against the pull of temptation, the eyes of males, and the stares of other women. There are also those who think the bride is establishing a new family ring by doing so.

Erusin Or Kiddushin (Betrothal)

There are two phases to a Japanese wedding: the betrothal (Erusin or Kiddushin) and the actual wedding (Nissuin) (nuptials). Once separated by several months, these celebrations are now held simultaneously.

The parents of the bride and groom and their children join the pair in the traditional blessing over a cup of wine to kick off the erusin. Kiddushin, the Hebrew word for "marriage," is derived from the Hebrew word for "holy," and so the second blessing sanctifies the couple as one holy unit.

One of the things that makes a Jewish marriage holy is the exchange of gifts between the bride and groom in the presence of witnesses. Therefore, the couple exchanges rings while saying, "Behold, you are devoted to me with this ring, in line with the laws of Moses and Israel," with the rings being complete and devoid of any stones to symbolise the wholeness and togetherness that comes from becoming married. Each ring is worn on the right index finger, a nod to the long-held notion that this digit is directly linked to the cardiovascular system. Anything of value, such as a ring, coin, or other item of jewellery, may be utilised for this phase of a Sephardic ritual.

Nissuin (Nuptials)

A second cup of wine is poured and the Sheva Brachot, or seven blessings, are chanted or read over it by the attending clergy or friends of the couple. As the two ceremonies of betrothal and marriage were originally two distinct events, the two cups of wine serve as a symbol of the time that elapsed between the two events. In the Sephardic tradition, Nissuin is performed with the same cup that was used during Erusin. The seven blessings are said at weddings in both the Ashkenazi and Sephardic communities, and they express gratitude for the following: the fruit of the vine; the creation of the world; the creation of humanity; the continuation of life; the continuation of the Jewish community; the joy of marriage; the happiness of the couple.

Ring Exchange

Jewish wedding bands are often plain metal ( silver,gold, or platinum) rather than studded with precious stones. The ring was the bride's "purchase price" or object of worth in ancient societies. Without stones, the ring's weight would be used to calculate its value, but that would be inaccurate if the ring had precious gems. Putting rings on the left forefinger is done in various cultures since that finger's vein travels directly to the heart.

Sheva B'rachot Means "Seven Blessings."

Sheva B'rachot are seven traditional blessings passed down through the ages. They are typically recited by a group of people from the family or community, in both Hebrew and English (just as friends and family are regularly asked to read at other weddings). The themes of the blessings include exuberance, celebration, and the redemptive potential of love. They begin with a toast over a glass of wine and build to increasingly elaborate and festive declarations before concluding with wishes for the newlyweds' happiness, serenity, and togetherness.

Breaking Of The Glass

The shattering of the glass is the most well-known ritual associated with Jewish weddings. The groom traditionally breaks a wine glass with his bare foot. However, modern custom dictates that the bride should feel free to join in the festivities. A symbol of the fall of the Temple in Jerusalem; a reminder to the newlyweds that life is full of both happiness and sadness; a metaphor for the precarious nature of human connections; there are many possible interpretations of this ceremony. The sound of shattering glass signals the arrival of the "Mazel Tov!" toast for wedding guests. "Let's start the celebration. Many newlyweds have a custom of breaking a glass as they kiss for the first time as man and wife.

The groom (or sometimes the bride and the groom) may be asked to tread on a glass contained in a cloth bag when the ritual comes to a close. The symbolic significance of the glass shards is multifold. Others see it as symbolic of the fall of the Jerusalem Temple. Others see it as a symbol of the vow to stick together through good times and bad and an illustration of the fact that marriage includes both joy and sadness. After the ceremony, the couple collects the cloth containing the shards of glass and often incorporates it into a keepsake of the wedding.

Mazel Tov!

Clapping and yelling "Mazel tov! is a well-known custom performed at Jewish weddings. After the toast is spoken and the glass is shattered, the guests will yell, "Mazel tov!" Mazel tov can be translated as "good luck" or "congratulations," yet its literal meaning is closer to "wishing the best for the future, a magnificent destiny," or "proclaiming that the individual or persons have just experienced tremendous fortune." You can't find a more appropriate occasion to use the phrase "mazel tov" than a wedding.

Yichud

The day has flown by for the happy couple. The newlyweds engage in a ritual called the Yichud, which literally translates to "seclusion," during which they go to a separate chamber to celebrate their new status as husband and wife in secret.

Traditional yichud practise requires at least eight minutes of intimate silence between partners after the ritual (or seclusion). This tradition gives the newlyweds some alone time to celebrate and reflect on their marriage. During the yichud, it is also traditional for the newlyweds to eat their first meal together as a married couple. Traditions in the kitchen might range from grandma's chocolate chip cookies to the Ashkenazim's "golden soup" (which is thought to bring prosperity and strengthen the body).

The Wedding Feast (Seudat Mitzvah)

Guests are obligated to make the chatan and kallah happy on their wedding day by spreading Simcha. There is a lot of music and dancing as everyone celebrates with the happy couple, and some of the guests even put on a show by doing juggling and acrobatics tricks.

Guests at a Jewish wedding are expected to join in the festivities and contribute to the newlyweds' joy. Dancing, especially the ancient Jewish circle dance known as the hora, is the most upbeat way to accomplish this. As a part of the celebration, the newlyweds will often be carried all around the dance floor in chairs as they enjoy this dance. Vogue Ballroom is your perfect wedding venue in Melbourne delivering fairytale weddings for the bride and groom.

Mezinke And Hora 

The hora is an upbeat dance performed in a circle during the reception's celebrations. Typically, the ladies dance with the ladies, and the gents with the gents. The bride and husband sit in chairs and are hoisted into the air, each holding a handkerchief or linen napkin. The mezinke is a dance performed by the parents of the bride or groom at the wedding of their youngest child.

Even though it is not customary during a Jewish wedding, some people choose to take a mikvah (ritual bath) before being married as a way to symbolise their passage from singlehood to matrimony.

The Jewish ceremony, as you can see, consists of numerous symbolic traditions that combine to create a day full of meaning, love, and joy as they commemorate the union of husband and wife.

Conclusion

There are several symbolic traditions in a Jewish wedding that highlight the importance of the couple's commitment to one another and to the Jewish community. Women wear shoulder-covering dresses and males wear Kippahs or Yarmulke for the ritual. Separate sections of the church may be used for guests at some Orthodox weddings, as well as separate sections for men and women. Men and women at an Orthodox Jewish wedding will sit on opposite sides of the room, or have separate sections for men and women. We do not advise using a mezuzah cover, as most of them are not large enough to accommodate a kosher scroll.

The bride and groom each host a reception for their guests, called Hachnasat Kallah and Chosen's Tish, respectively, as if they were royalty. According to Jewish custom, the chatan and kallah are compared to a monarch and a queen. The chatan will greet guests as he sits on a throne while the kallah sings and drinks toasts. Ashkenazi custom calls for the bride's mother and the groom's mother to smash a plate at the wedding reception. Bedeken, which means "checking," is an age-old activity with roots in the Bible.

Ketubahs are legal documents in Jewish culture; as such, they do not include any references to God or religious blessings for the marriage. Bedeken is not performed at weddings for Sephardic Jews (Jews from Spain and the Iberian Peninsula). A chuppah is a four-sided canopy used in Jewish wedding ceremonies to represent the couple's future dwelling as husband and wife. It can be created out of anything the couple finds meaningful, such as a prayer shawl or a handmade quilt. The order of the processional and recessional in Jewish ceremonies differs slightly from that of non-Jewish ceremonies.

Content Summary: 

  1. There are several symbolic traditions in a Jewish wedding that highlight the importance of the couple's commitment to one other and to the Jewish community.
  2. If you want to know more about what to expect during a Jewish wedding, read on!
  3. Listed below are, in a rabbi's opinion, the most frequently asked questions: How Should I Dress For A Jewish Wedding?
  4. This is the first question women will ask.
  5. It's your first query regarding anything and everything, but especially this place.
  6. But if you're a man, you could still be curious.
  7. The ladies often ask, "Is it too much to wear all black?"
  8. You can even ask if it's required in some groups.
  9. Although the hue is making a strong comeback, classic black will never go out of style.
  10. But there is a garment known as a "shell" that you should be aware of.
  11. Your basic black suit is good, gentlemen.
  12. Tuxedos are a rarity in Jewish weddings.
  13. Wear a respectable necktie, and you'll be set.
  14. The yarmulke, however, complicates matters for everyone.
  15. For an Orthodox wedding, a yarmulke is a necessary accessory.
  16. Your choice of yarmulke is a matter of personal preference; but, if you're the kind who likes to fit in, you may want to leave the satin one at home and instead take note of what the locals favour.
  17. Women traditionally wear shoulder-covering dresses and males wear Kippahs or Yarmulke for the ritual.
  18. Where should I sit?
  19. Separate sections of the church may be used for guests at some Orthodox weddings.
  20. There are even those that have a mechitza! 
  21. This may be more for the dancing than for the seating, depending on the crowd.
  22. Depending on the gathering, some who have a mechitza may use it more for dancing than seating.
  23. Some will have separate sections for men and women, while others will sit both sexes together.
  24. We have never seen mixed seating at an Orthodox chuppah.
  25. Conventionally, at Orthodox Jewish weddings, the male guests will stand while the female guests will sit on opposite sides of the room.
  26. A partition separates the male and female guests at an ultra-Orthodox wedding.
  27. Due to the nature of Jewish law, which prohibits mixed dancing, dancing will always be segregated.
  28. This can be done in a variety of ways, from using a mechitza to merely drawing a line in the middle of the circle.
  29. Do I Need To Bring A Gift?
  30. No one We seen at an Orthodox wedding has ever brought a gift, and We can't imagine why not.
  31. Some brides make a registry, but many do not, leaving you to fend for yourself.
  32. This is the greatest option for the couple so that they can avoid having to ship any of their belongings to Israel.
  33. You'll learn more about the meaning behind these joyful and beautiful Jewish wedding customs.
  34. They are treated like kings and queens on their wedding day.
  35. Kabbalat panim, literally "the receiving of faces," is the first step in a Jewish wedding.
  36. The bride and groom each host a reception for their guests, called Hachnasat Kallah and Chosen's Tish, respectively, as if they were royalty.
  37. The bride is greeted by her female guests, who are there to tend to her every want, as she sits atop a throne-like chair.
  38. Male guests toast the Chosen at the Tish, literally the "groom's table," during the wedding ceremony.
  39. This adds to the thrill and expectation of the occasion.
  40. Consequently, the chatan and kallah do not combine their greetings with one another until after the wedding ceremony.
  41. Kabbalat Panim is the name for this.
  42. According to Jewish custom, they are compared to a monarch and a queen.
  43. Guests will surround the chatan as he sits on a throne as the kallah sings and drinks toasts.
  44. Ashkenazi custom calls for the bride's mother and the groom's mother to smash a plate at the wedding reception.
  45. The purpose for this is to emphasise the gravity of the commitment: just as a broken plate can never be fixed completely, so can a shattered relationship.
  46. The aliyah is a blessing given to the bride and husband before the wedding ceremony.
  47. Immediately following the aliyah, the rabbi will recite a blessing known as misheberach, and at this point, it is traditional for members of the congregation to throw candy at the newlyweds as a symbol of good luck and a sweet married life.
  48. When the engagement ceremony was held as a distinct event in the past, the breaking of a plate by the two mothers represented their acceptance of the terms of the engagement.
  49. It's a prelude to the actual breaking of the glass during the wedding ceremony, which also represents the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem.
  50. Due to the significance of the wedding day as a day of forgiveness, some couples choose to observe a fast on their wedding day in the same manner as they would on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement.
  51. The wedding ceremony will mark the beginning of the fast, which the pair plans to observe until their first meal together.
  52. The Jewish wedding ceremony begins with the tish, which is Yiddish for a table, at the groom's home.
  53. In the meantime, the bride's female friends and family are entertaining her in another room.
  54. It lays out the terms he'll uphold in the marriage, the bride's rights and protections, and the procedure to be followed in the event of a divorce.
  55. Ketubahs are legal documents in Jewish culture; as such, they do not include any references to God or religious blessings for the marriage.
  56. It is customary for the ketubah to be signed by the bride and groom in the presence of two witnesses before the wedding and then read aloud to the guests.
  57. Bedeken Bedeken, which means "checking," is an age-old activity with roots in the Bible.
  58. According to one myth, the trouble started when Jacob's father-in-law Laban fooled him into marrying Leah by having her come to the wedding already veiled.
  59. He didn't realise she wasn't Rachel until after the wedding was over.
  60. The meeting of Isaac and Rebecca is the first time in the Torah that we hear of romantic feelings between two people.
  61. Rebecca's sense of modesty and humility causes her to decrease her aura and attractiveness to the point where Isaac trips over her veil and falls to the ground.
  62. If the bride will be wearing a veil, her groom will do so either before or after the processional.
  63. The bedeken is not performed at weddings for Sephardic Jews (Jews from Spain and the Iberian Peninsula).
  64. Alternatively, the wedding couple's palms may be decorated with henna at a celebration held a week before the ceremony.
  65. These identifiers help everyone find them on the big day, and some people even believe they ward off the "evil eye" as they celebrate.
  66. The groom traditionally performs the bedeken or veiling as they stand before the bride to sign the ketubah.
  67. In response to her beauty, he covers her face with his gaze.
  68. This represents both his affection for her on account of her intrinsic attractiveness and the fact that the two of them continue to maintain their unique identities even as husband and wife.
  69. There is also the biblically inspired legend that Jacob was deceived into marrying her sister of the lady he loved because she was veiled.
  70. The possibility of deception is eliminated if the bridegroom does the veiling himself.
  71. The chuppah (wedding canopy) symbolises God's protection over the couple and their new life together.
  72. Family and friends are always welcome in the couple's home, symbolised by the absence of walls and the presence of loved ones under the chuppah.
  73. The chuppah can be created out of anything the couple finds meaningful, such as a prayer shawl (tallit) or a handmade quilt.
  74. The poles on which the chuppah is typically mounted require the assistance of four people, usually friends or family members of the marriage.
  75. Check out Vogue Ballroom Wedding Venue for your ultimate wedding reception.
  76. The order of the processional and recessional in Jewish ceremonies differs slightly from that of non-Jewish ceremonies.
  77. Both of the groom's parents traditionally lead them along the aisle to a chuppah, the canopy under which Jewish wedding vows are exchanged.
  78. The bride's parents and bridal party come next.
  79. The chuppah is a traditional Jewish wedding canopy under which the bride, groom, and rabbi stand during the ceremony.
  80. The chuppah, an open-sided canopy that represents the house of the newlyweds, is where the ceremony takes place.
  81. From the time of the Jewish people's nomadic existence in the desert, this building was inspired by the tent of Abraham and Sarah, who were known for their hospitality.
  82. The design of the chuppah is not mandated by Jewish law.
  83. We've had the honour of assisting brides with the chuppah's design and floral arrangements, and we love seeing how each chuppah comes to reflect the unique style of the bride who commissioned it.
  84. A chuppah is a four-sided canopy used in Jewish wedding ceremonies to represent the couple's future dwelling as husband and wife.
  85. During the ceremony, friends and family of the couple may hold up the chuppah's four posts as a symbol of their commitment to the couple's new life together.
  86. However, sometimes it takes the form of a freestanding building decked out in floral arrangements.
  87. The tallit, or prayer shawl, of one of the bride and groom, or a member of their families, is often used to create the canopy.

FAQs About Jewish Wedding

Before getting married, a Jewish bride must purify herself in the mikvah (a ritual pool). The bride, the mikvah attendant, and sometimes the bride's mother or a close friend are the only people present at this ceremony.

The bride wears a veil while the husband dons a shroud-like garment for a pre-wedding celebration. Some of the wedding traditions of Kaufman details may not be observed by more modern Jews.

It is a long way from stag nights and prenuptial bacchanalias, which are usual in many parts of the world, to the fast day of the traditional Jew. The Sages attempted to prevent the drinking of alcoholic beverages before the wedding. Instead, guests and relatives would toast the future.

The traditional Jewish wedding begins with the groom and the bride hosting separate celebrations for their respective families' friends and family members simultaneously. The reception of the bride is traditionally the more lively of the two. The practice of having the bride take her place atop an ornate throne dates back centuries and is even mentioned in the Talmud.

Before the marriage, two blessings are recited at traditional weddings one is a blessing over the wine, and the other is a blessing stipulated in the Talmud. The wine is then provided for the pair to try together. Rings are unnecessary, but since the Middle Ages, they have been the most prevalent way of satisfying the bride price requirement. This does not mean that they are required.

Wedding bands for Jews don't have to break the bank. Giving a bride money or a ring is not the same as buying her (a common misconception). His spouse is neither his property nor his servant. In reality, the bridegroom is "purchasing" himself an intimate relationship with only her.

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