Melbourne Who pays for weddings

Who Pays For What For The Wedding?

You just got engaged, and now it's time to start making arrangements for the big day. But before you get started on any of that, you'll need to answer one crucial question: who is footing the bill for the wedding?

Paying for a wedding is no longer a clear cut financial divide. There is no binding law on fiscal responsibility, so let's get that out of the way first. Although it is common knowledge which the bride's family pays for most of the wedding, many modern couples choose to pay for their own wedding out of their own pockets.

In the words of Alicia Fritz, owner of A Day in May Events, "building your wedding cost is one of the most crucial and difficult challenges to do, but spending the time at the beginning of planning is likely to be your most great assistance along the way." The discussion of costs ought to start at the exact time as that of the guest list and the location. Most engaged couples don't connect the dots between how much they spend and how many people they invite to their wedding, but knowing your 'cost per customer' early on can help you make more financially responsible decisions, especially when evaluating vendors whose prices do not vary based on the number of guests.

Who Pays for the Wedding Melbourne

Many contemporary couples want to pay for their own weddings, either because it is their second wedding or because they want financial freedom from their parents. It's also conceivable that their relatives are unable to provide any assistance. "These days, more and more married couples are choosing to host all or part of their wedding receptions. We don't think it has anything to do with who runs the show during the day for our clients; rather, it seems to be more about the freedom (or success) they've had to devote more time to what they value most throughout the day, as opposed to what their parents value most "Says Fritz.

Alternatives to the strict adherence to tradition include a three-way split between the couple and their family members or friends. It's not often that this occurs, but if it does, it's the simplest solution. Finding a middle ground that benefits everyone is of paramount importance. Increased parental involvement among LGBTQ couples has been recorded since the historic 2015 U.S. Supreme Court verdict recognising same-sex marriages. However, the vast majority of LGBTQ people in the US still cover 100% of their wedding costs alone.

You should realise that there are pretty tight delineations if you (or your family) wish to cling to tradition or if you're just curious about the customary breakdown of fees. Below, we spell out in detail who, according to established norms, is expected to shoulder the financial burden for various purposes.

Each member of the bride's and groom's families plays a designated part in the ceremony at a traditional wedding. When it comes to the wedding, etiquette specifies who should foot the bill for what. Despite the fact that many contemporary couples don't follow these guidelines (for instance, some countries pay for the wedding entirely, while others divide up expenses dependent on who wants or is able to pay), it was still helpful to grasp them. They could even serve as a starting point for allocating resources and prioritising tasks as you plan your wedding.

Consider Who Usually Pays For The Wedding.

As according Lizzie Post, founder of the Amazing Etiquette Podcast and wonderful of Emily Post, the bride's family traditionally paid for most of the wedding's expenses, including the wedding, invitations, attire, ceremony, and celebration. She explains, "It's tougher to thinking about this now, as a feminist, but traditionally it is connected to that ancient practise of such a bride's family sending a dowry to a groom's family for taking the 'burden' of the a bride." In besides paying for the wedding fees up front, Victorians also gave the bride a trousseau, which included clothing and household goods for a year.

The parents of the bride also typically throw the engagement party. The bride paid for everything, including the ceremony flowers, bridesmaids' presents, the couple's ring, and a gift for the groom.

Traditionally, the groom's family would cover the expenditures of the rehearsal dinner, honeymoon, and all transportation and services on the wedding day. There was a catch, though: traditionally, the officiant was also selected by the groom's family. The wedding band, engagement ring, and bridesmaids' presents were all purchased by the groom.

If you and your soon-to-be spouse have been discussing how to divide up the wedding costs between you and your respective families, you might well have brought up the old standby in which the bride's family foots the bill for most of the festivities leading up to the wedding itself, including the engagement party and the reception's linen rentals. To begin, you wouldn't be the only pair in the world to do so. According to data from The Knot's 2017 Real Weddings Study, there is one area where customs hold strong: What exactly are the groom's parents responsible for, given that they only contribute 13% of the total wedding expenditure compared to the bride's parents' 49%?

The Bride's Parents

Even though the bride's family is usually not responsible for covering these expenses today, it is nonetheless interesting to learn about the historical norms. Everything from the bridesmaids' hotel rooms to the wedding invitations (but not the invites to the rehearsal dinner) should be included in the budget. The bridal gown, its accessories, and the bride's hair and cosmetics are all included. Maybe your doting grandma is paying for your dress, or maybe you're footing the bill yourself. Large expenses, such as a wedding planner, a bachelorette party, and the reception, are also covered by the bride's family (music, guest favours, rentals, etc.).

"Although some couples do choose to honour the custom about which parents paid for specific products, we open the conversation to our partners with out pressure of 'keeping suit' and discuss what it takes to follow tradition just tradition's sake against what the family is happy with," explains Fritz. Today's wedding receptions are very different from the ones that gave rise to customs such as wedding gifts.

The groom's headband and bridesmaid gifts are traditionally the only two items that the bride is expected to cover financially. Many of the expenses associated with a wedding, however, are often split between the bride & her family. When guests contribute financially, they have more say in the ceremony's details. Establish early on who has the last say by addressing assumptions. You can't assume that just because parents are chipping in financially that there aren't any strings attached, says Fritz. And, "it would be a tragedy to have injured feelings or conflicting messages if there's an expectation for 'control,' but it was never granted," she continues.

The advise We would provide to other brides is, "If you are establishing a budget, than set the budget. Fritz advises against setting an extremely tight budget in an effort to save money on items for which you will ultimately wind up spending more. Be practical. Always remember that the more people you invite, the more money you will need to spend on the wedding. While this isn't necessarily true in all circumstances, it is something to consider when setting priorities and allocating resources. If you can help it, avoid taking on additional debt to pay for your wedding. You can do anything you want to with the rest of your life. If you're resourceful, you can accomplish more with less.

Typically, the bride as well as her family foot the bill for the wedding's planning, the bride's dress, the flowers, the wedding party's transportation, the photographer's and videographer's services, the officiant's travel and lodgings (if he must travel from out of town), the bridesmaids' lodgings (unless you've offered to cover this cost), and the reception. The bride foots the bill for the wedding's floral arrangements and favours, as well as the ring and gift for the groom.

The Responsibility Of The Bride's Family Is:

  • Wedding celebration
  • Dress for a wedding (including veil and any accessories)
  • A coordinator or planner for a wedding.
  • Stationery, save-the-date cards, invitations, and wedding programmes
  • Photography/videography
  • Travel and lodging for the bridal party
  • Premarital celebrations
  • Ceremony/reception
  • Flowers/décor
  • Fancy tiers for the big day
  • Breakfast after church

The Family Of The Groom

The groom's parents are responsible for covering the costs of the wedding licence and officiant's fee, a rehearsal dinner (including the location, food, drink, decorations, entertainment, and yes, the invites, too), and the groom, his family, and his groomsmen's lodging and travel. The honeymoon used to be planned and paid for by the groom & his family, but these days it is more of a group effort and is sometimes even crowdfunded. Some newlyweds have their guests contribute to a "honeymoon fund" during the ceremony, while others create a "honeymoon registry" online to collect gifts for their trip.

This is done out of respect for tradition, and the number of gifts can be reduced or increased according to the couple's tastes and financial means. Having said that, McKee remarked that many people report feeling at ease while sticking to the formula. According to her, "most of our clientele keep to this tradition." Others put their own spin on it. It's not uncommon for the groom's family to cover the cost of the rehearsal dinner but leave the rest to the bride's side of the family, she explained. Unless the groom's family explicitly offered or requested the amount they were required to pay, "I've had some brides who chose to pay for all of it without mentioning the groom's expenses at all."

It is customary for the man to pay for the engagement ring or wedding band of his bride. Grooms traditionally pay for their own outfit (whether purchased or rented), though it's not unheard of for groom's family to chip in. Finally, the groom is on the hook for buying presents for the bride and her attendants.

Rings For The Bride

A wedding occurs after the groom has purchased and given a diamond ring to his soon-to-be bride. The wedding ring that the bride will receive is traditionally purchased by the groom or his family. Even though the bride and groom make the ring selection together, the husband will often pay for it.

Groomsmen And Groom Attire

Traditionally, the groom's family would foot the bill for the tuxedos or suits that the groom and his attendants will wear during the wedding (Note: In many modern weddings, the groomsmen pay for their own outfits.)

The Groom's Family Is In Charge Of:

  • Honeymoon
  • Cost of marriage licence and/or minister
  • Dress rehearsal meal
  • Flowers for the bridal party: bouquet, boutonnieres, & corsages
  • Costs associated with the groomsmen's travel and lodging
  • Wedding reception DJ/band and alcohol

In 2021, Who Pays For What At A Wedding?

Wedding Melbourne Who Pays

Let's take stock of where we are before diving into the standard breakdown of wedding costs. The majority of wedding costs are still covered by parents, with 52% based on the 2020 WeddingWire Recently married Report, while the couple covers 47% and other family and friends cover the remaining 1%.

However, partners in a couple are contributing a fair amount. The average age of a team has an effect on this. Between 42% and 56% of wedding costs are covered by parents for couples with wedding dates between 1981 and 1996. Contrarily, couples from Generation X (those between the years 1965 and 1980) spend for 78% all wedding costs on average, while parents pay for 20%.

In addition, a who pays for what varies among LGBTQIA+ couples, with the bride and groom paying for 61% of the wedding costs and the parents paying for 37%.

And if it's the couple's second marriage, they'll probably pay for it alone, with the couple paying 88% and the parents contributing 10% of the total.

In terms of wedding etiquette, it's important to keep in mind that whoever foots the bill gets to call the shots. For instance, if your family are footing the majority of the bill, they should have input into crucial decisions like the invite list, wedding location, and catering. On the wedding invitation, they will also be identified as the hosts.

Contributions To Your Wedding May Come With Conditions.

When relatives contribute financially, you may run into sticky circumstances in which they want their way instead of yours. In that case, you might want to think about footing the bill yourself. Having a wedding you desire on your terms can bring you far more peace of mind, even if you end up downsizing the celebrations.

Avoid Going There.

A newlywed couple's finances can be strained if they have to start out with a lot of debt, especially if one or both partners are still paying off student loans or saving for a family. Do everything in your power to prevent your daughter or son from getting a wedding debt.

You won't know how lavish to make the wedding until you find out how much money the bride's family and the groom's family can contribute.

If you are the parents of the bride and you are unable to cover the entire wedding, please do not feel guilty. In today's society, few would hold such an expectation. Don't promise to cover costs you can't meet, either. A wedding need not cost more than $15k, $10k, or even $5k.

Occasionally, the bride and groom or their families will decide that they need to go all out for their wedding. They want nothing less than the finest, even if you can't afford it. So that they can realise their goals, they obtain wedding loans.

An MBNA America Bank, among other lenders offering wedding loans, will advise you that it's a good idea to get a loan so that you can throw the wedding of your dreams. The bride is advised by the information available on the MBNA website (where she may submit an online loan application) to purchase beef rather than chicken for her guests. MBNA recommends that she invest in a designer gown rather than settling for a ready-made one. You probably already know there's a catch, and it's a big one.

Based on your credit score, MBNA will determine your interest rate, which is advertised as a range from 12% to 27%. We'll tell you now that anybody who borrows money at almost 28 percent interest for a wedding is completely nuts. She would be better off putting the entire expense on a credit or debit card and making monthly payments.

Don't even consider a wedding loan unless you definitely need the money for your wedding immediately. A home equity mortgage may be a better option because of the low interest rate.

Conclusion 

The most important details in this text are that paying for a wedding is no longer a clear cut financial divide, and that many modern couples choose to pay for their own wedding out of their own pockets. Alicia Fritz, owner of A Day in May Events, suggests that the discussion of costs should start at the exact time as that of the guest list and the location. She also suggests that more and more married couples are choosing to host all or part of their wedding receptions due to the freedom they have had to devote more time to what they value most. The most important details in this text are that traditional weddings typically involve a three-way split between the couple and their family members or friends, and that the bride's family traditionally pays for most of the wedding's expenses. This is connected to the ancient practise of sending a dowry to a groom's family for taking the 'burden' of the bride.

Additionally, the parents of the bride typically throw the engagement party, and the bride pays for everything, including ceremony flowers, bridesmaids' presents, the couple's ring, and a gift for the groom. The groom's family traditionally covered the expenses of the rehearsal dinner, honeymoon, transportation and services on the wedding day, but the officiant was also selected by the groom's family. The bride's family was responsible for most of the festivities leading up to the wedding itself, including the engagement party and the reception's linen rentals. Today, the bride's family is usually not responsible for covering these expenses, but it is interesting to learn about the historical norms. Today's wedding receptions are different from those that gave rise to customs such as wedding gifts.

The bride is expected to cover the groom's headband and bridesmaid gifts, but many of the expenses associated with a wedding are often split between the bride and her family. It is important to establish who has the last say by addressing assumptions and setting a budget. Additionally, it is important to remember that the more people you invite, the more money you will need to spend on the wedding. Finally, it is important to avoid taking on additional debt to pay for the wedding. The bride's family is responsible for the wedding celebration, dress, coordinator/planner, stationery, save-the-date cards, invitations, and programmes.

The groom's parents are responsible for covering the costs of the wedding licence and officiant's fee, a rehearsal dinner, lodging and travel, and the honeymoon. The groom is responsible for paying for the engagement ring or wedding band of his bride, their own outfit, and presents for the bride and her attendants. The wedding ring is traditionally purchased by the groom or his family. The majority of wedding costs are still covered by parents, with the couple covering 47% and other family and friends covering the remaining 1%. However, partners in a couple are contributing a fair amount.

The average age of a team has an effect on this, with couples from Generation X spending for 78% all wedding costs on average, while parents pay for 20%. LGBTQIA+ couples pay for 61% of the wedding costs and the parents pay for 37%, and if it's the couple's second marriage, they'll probably pay for it alone. In terms of wedding etiquette, whoever foots the bill gets to call the shots and should have input into crucial decisions like the invite list, wedding location, and catering. The most important details in this text are that a newlywed couple's finances can be strained if they have to start out with a lot of debt, and that MBNA America Bank, among other lenders offering wedding loans, recommends that the bride purchase beef rather than chicken for her guests and invest in a designer gown rather than settling for a ready-made one. However, there is a catch to getting a wedding loan, which is advertised as a range from 12% to 27%. It is better to put the entire expense on a credit or debit card and making monthly payments.

Content Summary: 

  1. You just got engaged, and now it's time to start making arrangements for the big day.
  2. But before you get started on any of that, you'll need to answer one crucial question: who is footing the bill for the wedding?Paying for a wedding is no longer a clear cut financial divide.
  3. There is no binding law on fiscal responsibility, so let's get that out of the way first.
  4. Although it is common knowledge which the bride's family pays for most of the wedding, many modern couples choose to pay for their own wedding out of their own pockets.
  5. In the words of Alicia Fritz, owner of A Day in May Events, "building your wedding cost is one of the most crucial and difficult challenges to do, but spending the time at the beginning of planning is likely to be your most great assistance along the way."
  6. The discussion of costs ought to start at the exact time as that of the guest list and the location.
  7. Most engaged couples don't connect the dots between how much they spend and how many people they invite to their wedding, but knowing your 'cost per customer' early on can help you make more financially responsible decisions, especially when evaluating vendors whose prices do not vary based on the number of guests.
  8. Many contemporary couples want to pay for their own weddings, either because it is their second wedding or because they want financial freedom from their parents.
  9. It's also conceivable that their relatives are unable to provide any assistance. "
  10. These days, more and more married couples are choosing to host all or part of their wedding receptions.
  11. We don't think it has anything to do with who runs the show during the day for our clients; rather, it seems to be more about the freedom (or success) they've had to devote more time to what they value most throughout the day, as opposed to what their parents value most "Says Fritz.
  12. Alternatives to the strict adherence to tradition include a three-way split between the couple and their family members or friends.
  13. It's not often that this occurs, but if it does, it's the simplest solution.
  14. Finding a middle ground that benefits everyone is of paramount importance.
  15. Increased parental involvement among LGBTQ couples has been recorded since the historic 2015 U.S. Supreme Court verdict recognising same-sex marriages.
  16. However, the vast majority of LGBTQ people in the US still cover 100% of their wedding costs alone.
  17. You should realise that there are pretty tight delineations if you (or your family) wish to cling to tradition or if you're just curious about the customary breakdown of fees.
  18. Below, we spell out in detail who, according to established norms, is expected to shoulder the financial burden for various purposes.
  19. Each member of the bride's and groom's families plays a designated part in the ceremony at a traditional wedding.
  20. When it comes to the wedding, etiquette specifies who should foot the bill for what.
  21. Despite the fact that many contemporary couples don't follow these guidelines (for instance, some countries pay for the wedding entirely, while others divide up expenses dependent on who wants or is able to pay), it was still helpful to grasp them.
  22. They could even serve as a starting point for allocating resources and prioritising tasks as you plan your wedding.
  23. As according Lizzie Post, founder of the Amazing Etiquette Podcast and wonderful of Emily Post, the bride's family traditionally paid for most of the wedding's expenses, including the wedding, invitations, attire, ceremony, and celebration.
  24. She explains, "It's tougher to thinking about this now, as a feminist, but traditionally it is connected to that ancient practise of such a bride's family sending a dowry to a groom's family for taking the 'burden' of the a bride."
  25. In besides paying for the wedding fees up front, Victorians also gave the bride a trousseau, which included clothing and household goods for a year.
  26. The parents of the bride also typically throw the engagement party.
  27. The bride paid for everything, including the ceremony flowers, bridesmaids' presents, the couple's ring, and a gift for the groom.
  28. Traditionally, the groom's family would cover the expenditures of the rehearsal dinner, honeymoon, and all transportation and services on the wedding day.
  29. There was a catch, though: traditionally, the officiant was also selected by the groom's family.
  30. The wedding band, engagement ring, and bridesmaids' presents were all purchased by the groom.
  31. If you and your soon-to-be spouse have been discussing how to divide up the wedding costs between you and your respective families, you might well have brought up the old standby in which the bride's family foots the bill for most of the festivities leading up to the wedding itself, including the engagement party and the reception's linen rentals.
  32. To begin, you wouldn't be the only pair in the world to do so.
  33. According to data from The Knot's 2017 Real Weddings Study, there is one area where customs hold strong: What exactly are the groom's parents responsible for, given that they only contribute 13% of the total wedding expenditure compared to the bride's parents' 49%?The Bride's Parents Even though the bride's family is usually not responsible for covering these expenses today, it is nonetheless interesting to learn about the historical norms.
  34. Everything from the bridesmaids' hotel rooms to the wedding invitations (but not the invites to the rehearsal dinner) should be included in the budget.
  35. The bridal gown, its accessories, and the bride's hair and cosmetics are all included.
  36. Maybe your doting grandma is paying for your dress, or maybe you're footing the bill yourself.
  37. Large expenses, such as a wedding planner, a bachelorette party, and the reception, are also covered by the bride's family (music, guest favours, rentals, etc.)."Although some couples do choose to honour the custom about which parents paid for specific products, we open the conversation to our partners with out pressure of 'keeping suit' and discuss what it takes to follow tradition just tradition's sake against what the family is happy with," explains Fritz.
  38. Today's wedding receptions are very different from the ones that gave rise to customs such as wedding gifts.
  39. The groom's headband and bridesmaid gifts are traditionally the only two items that the bride is expected to cover financially.
  40. Many of the expenses associated with a wedding, however, are often split between the bride & her family.
  41. When guests contribute financially, they have more say in the ceremony's details.
  42. Establish early on who has the last say by addressing assumptions.
  43. You can't assume that just because parents are chipping in financially that there aren't any strings attached, says Fritz.
  44. And, "it would be a tragedy to have injured feelings or conflicting messages if there's an expectation for 'control,' but it was never granted," she continues.
  45. The advise We would provide to other brides is, "If you are establishing a budget, than set the budget.
  46. Fritz advises against setting an extremely tight budget in an effort to save money on items for which you will ultimately wind up spending more.
  47. Be practical.
  48. Always remember that the more people you invite, the more money you will need to spend on the wedding.
  49. While this isn't necessarily true in all circumstances, it is something to consider when setting priorities and allocating resources.
  50. If you can help it, avoid taking on additional debt to pay for your wedding.
  51. You can do anything you want to with the rest of your life.
  52. If you're resourceful, you can accomplish more with less.
  53. Typically, the bride as well as her family foot the bill for the wedding's planning, the bride's dress, the flowers, the wedding party's transportation, the photographer's and videographer's services, the officiant's travel and lodgings (if he must travel from out of town), the bridesmaids' lodgings (unless you've offered to cover this cost), and the reception.
  54. The bride foots the bill for the wedding's floral arrangements and favours, as well as the ring and gift for the groom.
  55. The honeymoon used to be planned and paid for by the groom & his family, but these days it is more of a group effort and is sometimes even crowdfunded.
  56. Some newlyweds have their guests contribute to a "honeymoon fund" during the ceremony, while others create a "honeymoon registry" online to collect gifts for their trip.
  57. This is done out of respect for tradition, and the number of gifts can be reduced or increased according to the couple's tastes and financial means.
  58. Having said that, McKee remarked that many people report feeling at ease while sticking to the formula.
  59. According to her, "most of our clientele keep to this tradition."
  60. Others put their own spin on it.
  61. It's not uncommon for the groom's family to cover the cost of the rehearsal dinner but leave the rest to the bride's side of the family, she explained.
  62. Unless the groom's family explicitly offered or requested the amount they were required to pay, "I've had some brides who chose to pay for all of it without mentioning the groom's expenses at all.
  63. "It is customary for the man to pay for the engagement ring or wedding band of his bride.
  64. Grooms traditionally pay for their own outfit (whether purchased or rented), though it's not unheard of for groom's family to chip in.
  65. Finally, the groom is on the hook for buying presents for the bride and her attendants.
  66. A wedding occurs after the groom has purchased and given a diamond ring to his soon-to-be bride.
  67. Traditionally, the groom's family would foot the bill for the tuxedos or suits that the groom and his attendants will wear during the wedding. 
  68. Let's take stock of where we are before diving into the standard breakdown of wedding costs.
  69. The majority of wedding costs are still covered by parents, with 52% based on the 2020 WeddingWire Recently married Report, while the couple covers 47% and other family and friends cover the remaining 1%.However, partners in a couple are contributing a fair amount.
  70. The average age of a team has an effect on this.
  71. Between 42% and 56% of wedding costs are covered by parents for couples with wedding dates between 1981 and 1996.
  72. Contrarily, couples from Generation X (those between the years 1965 and 1980) spend for 78% all wedding costs on average, while parents pay for 20%.In addition, a who pays for what varies among LGBTQIA+ couples, with the bride and groom paying for 61% of the wedding costs and the parents paying for 37%.And if it's the couple's second marriage, they'll probably pay for it alone, with the couple paying 88% and the parents contributing 10% of the total.
  73. In terms of wedding etiquette, it's important to keep in mind that whoever foots the bill gets to call the shots.
  74. For instance, if your family are footing the majority of the bill, they should have input into crucial decisions like the invite list, wedding location, and catering.
  75. On the wedding invitation, they will also be identified as the hosts.
  76. When relatives contribute financially, you may run into sticky circumstances in which they want their way instead of yours.
  77. In that case, you might want to think about footing the bill yourself.
  78. A newlywed couple's finances can be strained if they have to start out with a lot of debt, especially if one or both partners are still paying off student loans or saving for a family.
  79. Do everything in your power to prevent your daughter or son from getting a wedding debt.
  80. You won't know how lavish the wedding is until you find out how much money the bride's family and the groom's family can contribute.
  81. If you are the parents of the bride and you are unable to cover the entire wedding, please do not feel guilty.
  82. In today's society, few would hold such an expectation.
  83. Don't promise to cover costs you can't meet, either.
  84. A wedding need not cost more than $15k, $10k, or even $5k.
  85. Occasionally, the bride and groom or their families will decide that they need to go all out for their wedding.
  86. They want nothing less than the finest, even if you can't afford it.
  87. So that they can realise their goals, they obtain wedding loans.
  88. An MBNA America Bank, among other lenders offering wedding loans, will advise you that it's a good idea to get a loan so that you can throw the wedding of your dreams.
  89. The bride is advised by the information available on the MBNA website (where she may submit an online loan application) to purchase beef rather than chicken for her guests.
  90. MBNA recommends that she invest in a designer gown rather than settling for a ready-made one.
  91. You probably already know there's a catch, and it's a big one.
  92. Based on your credit score, MBNA will determine your interest rate, which is advertised as a range from 12% to 27%.
  93. We'll tell you now that anybody who borrows money at almost 28 percent interest for a wedding is completely nuts.
  94. She would be better off putting the entire expense on a credit or debit card and making monthly payments.
  95. Don't even consider a wedding loan unless you definitely need the money for your wedding immediately.
  96. A home equity mortgage may be a better option because of the low interest rate.

Frequently Asked Questions About Wedding

The parents of the groom are expected to pay for the marriage license and officiant fee, the rehearsal dinner (including the venue, food, drink, decorations, entertainment—and yes—the invitations, too), and accommodations/transportation pertaining to the groom's family and groomsmen.

The groom's family is responsible for corsages and boutonnieres for immediate members of both families, the lodging of the groom's attendants (if you have offered to help pay for this expense), and sometimes the costs of the rehearsal dinner.

You might be aware that the bride's family is expected to cover the majority of the wedding day costs, while the groom's family pays for a variety of extra activities, like the rehearsal dinner and the honeymoon.

Traditionally, the groom's family paid for the honeymoon, but like every wedding, no two couples are alike — and neither are their families. The question of who pays for the honeymoon often depends on family relationships, traditions, and, of course, the couple's personal preference.

Not only does the bride's family pay for the wedding day outfit and accessories (veil, shoes, jewelry and more), but they're also responsible for the bride's wardrobe for all of the pre-wedding events (the shower, beach party, rehearsal dinner and honeymoon).

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