Wedding Photography

How To Get Married In Australia?

When we get engaged, we begin our path towards becoming a married couple. Planning every detail of your wedding, from the location to the attire, might easily cause you to overlook any legal requirements that must be met.

You must be aware of the necessary legal steps to take before planning your wedding in Australia. Be sure to keep these things in mind whether you're having a religious wedding or a civil one.

In Australia, both partners must be of legal age to enter into a binding marriage contract. There is no need for citizenship or permanent residency to be married in Australia. Marriage visa information is provided for those who are not Australian citizens but who want to settle in Australia following their wedding.

Many international same-sex couples go to Australia for the country's liberal marriage laws. Even though marriage equality has not yet been achieved in their home countries, couples from Philippines, Indonesia, India, Pakistan, Singapore, Malaysia, China, and Hong Kong are flocking here to tie the knot.

And several things are causing this influx:

  • Flights are quite inexpensive in comparison to other nations, and marriage equality is implemented.
  • The chance to combine a vacation to Australia for their "honeymoon" with some sightseeing.
  • Their currencies have generally strong exchange rates.

Whether you are from a nation other than Australia, kindly verify to see if your country requires its Embassy to grant you permission before you marry in order to allow them to recognise your Australian marriage in accordance with the legal requirements.

This has repercussions for non-Australian nationals, especially LGBTQIA couples, who want to return to their home country after marrying in Australia.

How Is ‘Marriage’ Defined In Australia?

The Marriage Act of 1961 defines marriage as "the voluntary union of two persons to the exclusion of all others." On December 9, 2017, this revised definition became law. This new definition has compelled state and territorial governments to match their laws and regulations. When marriage equality became legal in Australia, several state-based regulations and regulatory requirements made it more challenging for certain members of the LGBTQIA community than the majority of the population to express their right to marry. That is now corrected.

In order to marry in Australia, a couple must be at least 18 years old. Marriage between the ages of sixteen and eighteen requires parental consent and a court ruling.

Before You Get Married

Do the following before you tie the knot:

  • fill out a "notice of intent to marry."
  • Please submit it to a legal marriage celebrant no later than 18 months before the ceremony.

If you need assistance filling out the paperwork, you should consult with a legal marriage celebrant. If you're currently living outside of Australia but want to be married there, you may fill it out.

Your official marriage celebrant should be consulted if your wedding is less than a month away. A marriage licence is only valid if issued by the appropriate government. Getting married in a hurry is common for a variety of reasons, including but not limited to:

  • professional or vacation obligations
  • preparations for a wedding or other celebration
  • medical reasons
  • legal proceedings
  • error in giving notice

The following items should also be available for your official wedding celebrant:

  • valid documentation of your birth date and location (birth  passport or certificate)
  • identity (driver’s licence or passport)
  • evidence of the dissolution of a prior marriage

What Are The Requirements?

If you want to be married in Australia without breaking any laws, there are a few things you need to know. The Office of the Attorney General outlines the following prerequisites:

  • If the person is between the ages of 16 and 18, the court may provide permission for them to participate, but this is not guaranteed.
  • Neither one of them should have a spouse at the moment.
  • Someone shouldn't marry a sibling, a parent, a grandparent, a kid, or a grandchild.
  • You've done your homework on the other person and agree that you're ready to tie the knot with them.
  • This individual is required to utilise certain language throughout the wedding ceremony.
    • Within the specified time limit, you must notify the person legally authorised to solemnise marriages (the "marriage celebrant") that you want to get married.
    • Here you may find the form for submitting a Notice of Intended Marriage.
    • The celebrant should receive the signed document between 18 months and a month before the wedding.
    • A designated authority may be able to provide a short notice wedding licence if it is less than one month before the ceremony.
    • The celebrant will need the following documentation to verify your identity, your date of birth, and the existence of any prior marriages. Sometimes a statutory declaration must be filled out as well.
    • You may use this directory to find a licensed celebrant.

Melbourne Wedding Pagan

What Kind Of Documentation Are Required?

  • Certificate or extract of birth data issued by the government
  • Valid, original, Australian or foreign passport
  • A death certificate or divorce decree (if you were previously married) will suffice as confirmation of your single status.
  • The celebrant will supply you with the appropriate forms to make the required statutory statement.
  • An announcement of a planned marriage, as described above.

Same-Sex Marriage In Australia

The ease with which couples may tie the knot in Australia, in comparison to other nations where they would have gone for it; the wide availability of secure locations in which they can do so, in lieu of the more conventional (and costly) alternatives; all of these factors together.

The couple may be married in front of two adult witnesses and a marriage celebrant without spending a lot of money or time planning a formal ceremony, and they can then use the savings to have a big party at home if they so want.

Legal requirements for tying the knot in Australia

Getting married in Australia is easy, but there are a few requirements you must complete beforehand. For instance, you need the ability to:

  • You must either be able to state that you have never been married to anybody else (the legal term for this is "never legitimately married") or produce proof that any previous marriages to you or anyone else have terminated in one of three ways: divorce, death of the other party, or annulment.
  • Having no interest in getting married to a member of one's own family, such as a parent, sibling, cousin, niece, nephew, niece, nephew, cousin, or grandparent.
  • Be at least 18 years old, unless both partners have obtained parental consent or a court order allowing the marriage to proceed if either is 16 or 17 years old. Two people under the age of eighteen should not get married.
  • To be able to provide informed permission to a marriage without feeling pressured or manipulated, one must have a firm grasp of the meaning and importance of marriage.
  • A wedding ceremony often includes a series of words that are spoken by the couple. Words taken directly from the Marriage Act 1961, which your celebrant will supply.
  • Let your official marriage officiant know that you've decided to tie the knot. If you want to be married, you need to give your celebrant at least a month's notice. A "Notification of Intended Marriage" is the form used for giving such notice.

If you have any questions or concerns, your marriage celebrant will be there to help you through the process.

In Australia, if both parties satisfy the aforementioned criteria, they may legally get married. To be lawfully married in Australia, neither you nor your intended spouse need to be permanent residents or citizens of Australia.

There will be more forms for you to fill out and sign on the big day. We will have you sign a Declaration of No Legal Impediment to Marriage before the wedding, and we will be there to witness your signatures. We will have you and your two witnesses sign three marriage certificates immediately after the ceremony, and we will give you one of them as a wedding gift.

Within 2 weeks of the wedding, we will also submit the necessary documents to the local registrar of births, deaths, and marriages. That must be done because it is the law. If you want a copy of your legally binding marriage certificate, we let you know when the appropriate government agency has registered your marriage and offer you a link to the site where you may do so.

What the bride pays for In A Wedding

Important Notes To Remember.

  • Same-sex marriage is legal in Australia.
  • In Australia, both legal and religious weddings performed by celebrants are recognised by the Commonwealth.
  • Even if you are not an Australian citizen or permanent resident, you may still be married in Australia.
  • You and your spouse-to-be, together with two witnesses and the officiant, will need to sign a total of three marriage certificates on the big day. A replica of the certificate will be sent to you.
  • The celebrant will submit your marriage documents to the appropriate government agency within 14 days after the ceremony.
  • If you are looking for information on the legal requirements for getting married in Australia, you should visit the Getting Married page on the Attorney-Department General's website.

Conclusion

Many international same-sex couples go to Australia for the country's liberal marriage laws. In order to marry in Australia, a couple must be at least 18 years old. The Marriage Act of 1961 defines marriage as "the voluntary union of two persons to the exclusion of all others". A marriage licence is only valid if issued by the appropriate government. If you're currently living outside of Australia but want to be married there, you may fill it out.

A designated authority may be able to provide a short notice wedding licence if it is less than one month before the ceremony. Getting married in Australia is easy, but there are a few requirements you must complete beforehand. You must either be able to state that you have never been married to anybody else (the legal term for this is "never legitimately married") or produce proof that any previous marriages to you or anyone else have terminated in one of three ways.

Content Summary:

  • When we get engaged, we begin our path towards becoming a married couple.
  • Planning every detail of your wedding, from the location to the attire, might easily cause you to overlook any legal requirements that must be met.
  • You must be aware of the necessary legal steps to take before planning your wedding in Australia.
  • Be sure to keep these things in mind whether you're having a religious wedding or a civil one.
  • In Australia, both partners must be of legal age to enter into a binding marriage contract.
  • There is no need for citizenship or permanent residency to be married in Australia.
  • Marriage visa information is provided for those who are not Australian citizens but who want to settle in Australia following their wedding.
  • Many international same-sex couples go to Australia for the country's liberal marriage laws.
  • Even though marriage equality has not yet been achieved in their home countries, couples from Philippines, Indonesia, India, Pakistan, Singapore, Malaysia, China, and Hong Kong are flocking here to tie the knot.
  • And several things are causing this influx: Flights are quite inexpensive in comparison to other nations, and marriage equality is implemented.
  • The chance to combine a vacation to Australia for their "honeymoon" with some sightseeing.
  • Their currencies have generally strong exchange rates.
  • Whether you are from a nation other than Australia, kindly verify to see if your country requires its Embassy to grant you permission before you marry in order to allow them to recognise your Australian marriage in accordance with the legal requirements.
  • This has repercussions for non-Australian nationals, especially LGBTQIA couples, who want to return to their home country after marrying in Australia.
  • How Is 'Marriage' Defined In Australia?
  • The Marriage Act of 1961 defines marriage as "the voluntary union of two persons to the exclusion of all others."
  • On December 9, 2017, this revised definition became law.
  • This new definition has compelled state and territorial governments to match their laws and regulations.
  • When marriage equality became legal in Australia, several state-based regulations and regulatory requirements made it more challenging for certain members of the LGBTQIA community than the majority of the population to express their right to marry.
  • That is now corrected.
  • In order to marry in Australia, a couple must be at least 18 years old.
  • Please submit it to a legal marriage celebrant no later than 18 months before the ceremony.
  • If you need assistance filling out the paperwork, you should consult with a legal marriage celebrant.
  • If you're currently living outside of Australia but want to be married there, you may fill it out.
  • Your official marriage celebrant should be consulted if your wedding is less than a month away.
  • A marriage licence is only valid if issued by the appropriate government.
  • Getting married in a hurry is common for a variety of reasons, including but not limited to: professional or vacation obligations preparations for a wedding or other celebration medical reasons legal proceedings error in giving notice The following items should also be available for your official wedding celebrant: valid documentation of your birth date and location (birth  passport or certificate) identity (driver's licence or passport) evidence of the dissolution of a prior marriage What Are The Requirements?
  • If you want to be married in Australia without breaking any laws, there are a few things you need to know.
  • The Office of the Attorney General outlines the following prerequisites: If the person is between the ages of 16 and 18, the court may provide permission for them to participate, but this is not guaranteed.
  • Neither one of them should have a spouse at the moment.
  • Someone shouldn't marry a sibling, a parent, a grandparent, a kid, or a grandchild.
  • You've done your homework on the other person and agree that you're ready to tie the knot with them.
  • This individual is required to utilise certain language throughout the wedding ceremony.
  • Within the specified time limit, you must notify the person legally authorised to solemnise marriages (the "marriage celebrant") that you want to get married.
  • Here you may find the form for submitting a Notice of Intended Marriage.
  • The celebrant should receive the signed document between 18 months and a month before the wedding.
  • A designated authority may be able to provide a short notice wedding licence if it is less than one month before the ceremony.
  • The celebrant will need the following documentation to verify your identity, your date of birth, and the existence of any prior marriages.
  • Sometimes a statutory declaration must be filled out as well.
  • What Kind Of Documentation Are Required?
  • Certificate or extract of birth data issued by the government Valid, original, Australian or foreign passport A death certificate or divorce decree (if you were previously married) will suffice as confirmation of your single status.
  • The celebrant will supply you with the appropriate forms to make the required statutory statement.
  • An announcement of a planned marriage, as described above.
  • Same-Sex Marriage In Australia  The ease with which couples may tie the knot in Australia, in comparison to other nations where they would have gone for it; the wide availability of secure locations in which they can do so, in lieu of the more conventional (and costly) alternatives; all of these factors together.
  • The couple may be married in front of two adult witnesses and a marriage celebrant without spending a lot of money or time planning a formal ceremony, and they can then use the savings to have a big party at home if they so want.
  • Legal requirements for tying the knot in Australia Getting married in Australia is easy, but there are a few requirements you must complete beforehand.
  • For instance, you need the ability to: You must either be able to state that you have never been married to anybody else (the legal term for this is "never legitimately married") or produce proof that any previous marriages to you or anyone else have terminated in one of three ways: divorce, death of the other party, or annulment.
  • Having no interest in getting married to a member of one's own family, such as a parent, sibling, cousin, niece, nephew, niece, nephew, cousin, or grandparent.
  • Be at least 18 years old, unless both partners have obtained parental consent or a court order allowing the marriage to proceed if either is 16 or 17 years old.
  • Two people under the age of eighteen should not get married.
  • To be able to provide informed permission to a marriage without feeling pressured or manipulated, one must have a firm grasp of the meaning and importance of marriage.
  • A wedding ceremony often includes a series of words that are spoken by the couple.
  • Words taken directly from the Marriage Act 1961, which your celebrant will supply.
  • Let your official marriage officiant know that you've decided to tie the knot.
  • If you want to be married, you need to give your celebrant at least a month's notice.

FAQs About Wedding

Whether you are a native Australian or an international guest, these procedures will make your wedding day legally hassle-free. The Australian government revised the Marriage Act in December 2017 to make getting married simpler for locals and visitors.

The celebrant has 14 days to submit the necessary papers (NOIM, Declaration, and one of the Official Certificates of Marriage) to the Registry of Births, Deaths, and Marriages in the Australian state or territory where the marriage took place.

Rules for getting married in Australia are outlined in the Marriage Act 1961 and the Marriage Regulations 2017. We can only provide broad information on marriage in Australia, not particular legal advice. If you need help planning your wedding, don't hesitate to ask us or seek the services of a legal celebrant.

In Australia, same-sex marriage is recognised by law. Furthermore, in Australia, marriages may be solemnised by any Commonwealth-registered celebrant, regardless of the ceremony's religious or secular orientation. So even if you are not an Australian citizen or permanent resident, you may still be married in Australia.

In Australia, only legally recognised celebrants may perform wedding ceremonies. However, ministers of religion, registrars appointed by states and territories, and city officials may all perform wedding ceremonies.

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