wedding couple

How do I choose my wedding colors?

Choosing the right colours for your wedding may seem like a daunting task, but it is a crucial part of the planning process. It is important to choose a colour scheme for your wedding that not only reflects your personal tastes as a couple, but also works together to create an overall theme. The date and location of the wedding are the first steps in planning the colour scheme, but where do you even start? You may start to nail down the colours which will play into the aesthetic you desire by thinking about your wedding's essential aspects, such as the season, location, and theme. The flowers, stationery, wedding party apparel, table linens, and more will all coordinate with your chosen colours once you've made that decision.

You don't want to let the stress of planning your wedding prevent you from enjoying the process. To begin planning your wedding, one of the first and most crucial steps is deciding on a colour palette. If you're having trouble deciding, consider picking colours that complement each other and work well together, picking colours that match the environment, or drawing inspiration from your current favorites and decorating styles.

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What Wedding Colors to Pick

Take Cues From Your Environment

Location, location, location. Prior to beginning your search for a location, have a colour scheme in mind. Think about the colours you want to employ and whether you'd rather have the ideal location or the ideal colour palette. If you locate a great location that doesn't quite fit your colour scheme, you may want to consider switching things up by adding or subtracting a few shades. Converted warehouses, lofts, and tents are all essentially blank canvases on which to paint your artistic vision. If you've settled on the perfect location, let it inform your choice of colours. Colors in your welcome area and beyond, like that antique Persian rug in the dining hall or the ocean beyond, might serve as an inspiration. That way, you can focus on making the most of your location rather than fighting against its colour scheme.

Maintain a Focused Attitude

While the wedding venue is typically the most important decision to be made, there are other factors that may need to be considered before you settle on your colour scheme. For example, if you've always imagined your wedding full of purple dendrobium orchids, you should base your colour scheme on those flowers rather than trying to find a method to include them into your design at a later date. The last thing you want is to pick a colour scheme and have an absolute must-have, like your grandma's ivory table runner, seem out of place or get lost in the décor instead of sticking out as you intended.

Think Seasonally

A wedding's colour scheme, like an outfit, can be influenced by the season. Determine whatever colour you'd like to use to highlight the season. In the spring, rosy pink is ideal, while in the summer, coral is a must-have. Deep fuchsia complements autumn's jewel tones, while blush and silver provide a lovely winter colour scheme. Don't be afraid to wear the colours you love, even if they aren't "in season;" seasonal colour "laws" are as out of date as wearing white following Labor Day. A wedding in the fall or winter might be just as beautiful in a light pastel or barely there shade like buff. Focusing on texture, and perhaps introducing a bolder accent colour, is the key.

Set the Mood

The colours you choose for your wedding can also set the tone. Instead of using pastel colours, a dark or jewel tone palette, such as ruby red and black or jade and gold, can add a lot of drama to a design. Consider the mood and tone you'd like to set, whether it be cosy or nostalgic, and the colours that conjure those emotions for you.

Ponder Your Passions

You've chosen colours for your home's decor that you know you'll be happy with for a long period of time (and it's nice to know that your Moroccan lanterns and other wedding day trinkets will have a second life after the big day). What colours do you find yourself reaching for when you open your closet? You can use that as inspiration for your wedding colour scheme.

Do Your Research

Magazines, museums, and even the nuptials of your friends can all provide as fantastic ideas. You shouldn't pick a colour scheme just because it's popular, but you might get a fresh perspective on a colour you already adore by studying current colour trends in art and design.

Use the Color Wheel as a Guide

Picking colours isn't something that requires formal training, but there are some guidelines to keep in mind. In general, complementary colours are those that pair a cold and warm hue. Neighboring colours are complementary because they are close in hue and value. Violet and grey, blush and gold, and so on are all examples of classic colour combinations that work well together.

Pick a Primary Hue

Your wedding's primary colour is the foundation upon which the rest of your colour choices will be made. Depending on the mood you're going for, the base colour might range from a subtle baby pink or peach to an elegant bright yellow, dramatic jade green, or navy blue. Ideally, it would be a shade that you find aesthetically pleasing. After settling on a primary hue, you'll want to pick out two or three "accent" colours that will pop against it. These finishing touches will give your wedding's colour scheme the last touches it needs to avoid seeming too uniform or tacky. Accent colours can range from primary colours to secondary colours to neutral colours like beige, black, white, or grey . What, no foundational hue yet? If you want to know more about how to choose your bridal colours from scratch, read on.

Keep the Wedding Season in Mind

While there is no hard and fast rule that says you have to have your wedding colours coincide with the season, there's no denying that certain hues are more in sync with a particular season than others. Look to the upcoming wedding season if you're having trouble deciding on a colour scheme. The colder the weather, the more at home dark jewel tones, such as marsala red, emerald green, navy blue, and plum purple. Weddings in the spring are commonly associated with more subdued colours, while summer celebrations typically call for more vibrant and eye-catching hues.

Think About Where You’ll Be Holding the Event

Next, picture the setting for your event. Do you envision your wedding in an open-concept warehouses with white walls, or a grand ballroom with patterned wallpaper and glitzy gold accents? The colours you choose should be influenced by the existing (or lack of) elements at your venue. Tented receptions, barns, outdoor spaces, and other "blank slate" venues will allow you to choose your wedding colours without worrying about conflicting with the current decor. When planning the colour scheme for a place that already has decor, like a hotel, country club, restaurant, or museum, take note of the colours already there.

What’s Your Wedding Style?

The process of selecting wedding colours should begin with identifying your event's overall aesthetic. It's not surprising that some wedding colours are more well-suited to particular themes than others; for instance, a lavish 1920s, Gatsby-inspired motif wouldn't go well with brilliant blue and fuchsia. The same can't be said for a nautical party when colours like metallic gold and purple would be appropriate. Seeking some fashion inspo? Check out these suggestions for the big day. Your wedding colours can be narrowed down through an elimination process once you've decided on a theme.

Choose a Colour Palette That Makes You Seem Good

You should choose your wedding colours with some self-interest. You should consider the colours that look best with your skin tone because you may be wearing at least one among your wedding colours on the big day. It is customary, for instance, to complement a suit with a pocket square or tie in the same colour family. It's fine to cross pale yellow off the list of possible wedding colours if it doesn't do you justice. The bride in a white dress should still give thought to the other colourful elements of her wedding day look, such as the bouquet and shoes. What will your wedding party members be wearing? Your wedding party is likely to include people of different ethnicities, which means that you will be photographed alongside them multiple times throughout the day. Keep everyone (including yourself) looking their best by incorporating at least one universally appealing colour into your palette. Medium and deeper tones, like eggplant, baby blue, navy, and red, are some of the greatest alternatives.

Make Use of Gradients to Liven up Your Colour Scheme

You just can't seem to put together a pleasing palette of colours. Keep things easy by using an ombré colour scheme based on a single hue. Even if you're not a fan of rainbows, a marriage with three or four distinct hues of blue (or your favourite colour!) can be just as stunning. A wedding with a monochromatic colour scheme can benefit greatly from this alternative.

Inspire Yourself With Seasonal Celebrations

Saying your vows during or around a holiday provides the perfect opportunity to incorporate the event's traditional colours into your big day. colours like green for St. Patrick's Day, pink and pastels for Easter, black and gold for New Year's Eve, and so on. However, you shouldn't take the colours too literally; instead, use them as a springboard for your own creative process rather than a rigid guideline. Avoid going overboard with holiday-specific furnishings if you choose a palette influenced by the season. The colours themselves will be more than enough.

Seek Motivation

Pick a hue that will serve as a source of motivation. If daffodils are your beloved flower, you can draw inspiration for your wedding colours from their blossoms by using bright yellows and clean whites. Pick a shade that has always spoke to you, or one that you just discovered you love. If choosing colours isn't something you're really passionate about, you shouldn't let anyone else decide for you. To truly make your wedding day your own, you should choose a colour scheme that brings you joy.

Keep an eye out for the ornamental pillows the next time you're out shopping for home furnishings at a department store. Designers are highly skilled professionals who are compensated for their in-depth knowledge of how various colour palettes work together. Finding your wedding day colour palette in the patterns and hues of decorative throw pillows is a terrific idea!

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Keep Your Colour Sense in Check

It's okay if not everything matches. If you do this every day, you may give the impression that you are constantly busy. There's no need to match the ribbons on the chairs or the cake icing in every detail. It's possible that using colour to organise the wedding's details is a bad idea that won't end up looking well in any photos.

Even if you find a fantastic colour scheme, don't use more than three or five different hues on your wedding day. More than that, and it risks looking disorganised or random.

Talk It Over With Your Suppliers

Get a bouquet sample for the centrepiece so you can see the colours in person. It's important to make sure you and your florists are on the same page when it comes to the florals that will be used throughout your wedding. Pantone is a great resource for locating specific colours and ensuring that your palette is cohesive. Then, you may send it around to your suppliers to ensure that everyone is using the same palette.

Even if you haven't settled on a specific theme (vintage, retro, modern, etc.), considering how you'd like guests to feel will help you plan. Even if they haven't decided on colours or whether they want a garden or city-themed wedding, most engaged couples already have an idea of how they want their special day to look. Do you hope for a casual atmosphere at your gathering? Sophisticated? Festive? Playful? Romantic?

The way something looks and, more importantly, how it makes you feel, can be profoundly impacted by the colours used. Colors can both enliven and calm the mind and body. Choose your wedding colours based on the vibe you hope to evoke from your guests. Consider the bright, upbeat colour palettes associated with fiesta-themed weddings if, for instance, you're keen to arrange the party of the year, complete with loud music, laughter, and plenty of fine beer (above). Using vibrant, eye-catching colours will excite your visitors and add that extra dash of joy you're hoping for to your event.

Yet, brights aren't the way to go if you want your wedding to have a sophisticated and classy ambience that will leave your guests amazed. Think of using muted colours with metallic accents and gentle shading.

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Don’t Overthink It

It's simple to become obsessed with the concept that your wedding must adhere to a specific colour scheme. You may feel pressured to choose the "correct" colours from well-meaning friends and family members who keep asking, "What are your colours?" if you're just getting started with the planning process. However, colour need not perform the pivotal function that it is commonly accorded. Although your colour scheme will serve as a general guideline for many of your wedding's elements, such as the flowers and the clothes your attendants wear, you should use it more as a suggestion than a mandate. Don't worry yourself to death making sure that every last detail of your wedding is precisely coordinated in terms of colour. Instead, in addition to colour, consider the wedding's overall formality, texture, and atmosphere as you design.

The day of your wedding should be perfect in every way. Make sure the wedding colours are ones that truly reflect who you are and how you want to feel on your big day. This is your wedding day, so feel free to go all out with the decorations.

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Conclusion

Choosing a colour scheme for a wedding is the second step after deciding on the date and location. Perhaps now is the time to settle on a palette that will help you achieve the look you've been envisioning. Choose colours that go well together if you can't decide. The season can serve as inspiration for the wedding's colour palette. A rosy pink is perfect for the spring, while a coral shade is a summertime essential.

Buff or another pale pastel could be lovely for a wedding in the fall or winter. You don't need a degree in art to choose colours, but there are some rules of thumb to follow. In terms of hue and value, neighbouring colours are harmonious with one another. There is no steadfast rule that says your wedding palette must reflect the time of year. The first step in choosing wedding colours is settling on the celebration's style.

It's important to choose wedding colours carefully, as some go better with certain themes than others. Some of the best options are those with a medium to deep shade, such as eggplant, baby blue, navy, and red. Pick a shade that will spark some enthusiasm for the big day! The daffodil can serve as a source of motivation if that is your favourite flower. It's important to pick a colour scheme that makes you happy because it will be a constant reminder of the special day you're celebrating.

If you haven't settled on a theme for your party, thinking about the emotions you hope to evoke in your guests can help. Use Pantone as a guide to find specific colours and create a harmonious colour scheme. Determine the mood you want to set for your wedding with the colours you choose. If you want your wedding to have a sophisticated and elegant atmosphere, brights aren't the way to go. Instead, when planning the decor for the wedding, keep the event's formality, texture, and atmosphere in mind. Decoration-wise, today is your wedding day, so go all out if you like.

Content Summary

  • To begin planning your wedding, one of the first and most crucial steps is deciding on a colour palette.
  • Prior to beginning your search for a location, have a colour scheme in mind.
  • Think about the colours you want to employ and whether you'd rather have the ideal location or the ideal colour palette.
  • A wedding's colour scheme, like an outfit, can be influenced by the season.
  • Determine whatever colour you'd like to use to highlight the season.
  • The colours you choose for your wedding can also set the tone.
  • Consider the mood and tone you'd like to set, whether it be cosy or nostalgic, and the colours that conjure those emotions for you.
  • Your wedding's primary colour is the foundation upon which the rest of your colour choices will be made.
  • Look to the upcoming wedding season if you're having trouble deciding on a colour scheme.
  • Next, picture the setting for your event.
  • The colours you choose should be influenced by the existing (or lack of) elements at your venue.
  • Keep things easy by using an ombré colour scheme based on a single hue.
  • Avoid going overboard with holiday-specific furnishings if you choose a palette influenced by the season.
  • To truly make your wedding day your own, you should choose a colour scheme that brings you joy.
  • It's okay if not everything matches.
  • Get a bouquet sample for the centrepiece so you can see the colours in person.
  • Choose your wedding colours based on the vibe you hope to evoke from your guests.
  • Think of using muted colours with metallic accents and gentle shading.
  • Instead, in addition to colour, consider the wedding's overall formality, texture, and atmosphere as you design.
  • The day of your wedding should be perfect in every way.
  • Make sure the wedding colours are ones that truly reflect who you are and how you want to feel on your big day.

FAQs About Wedding Colors

Achieving this colour scheme can be done with a wide variety of tones, including blush, grey, mauve, beige, and even a pastel blue. If you're feeling like your life needs more colour, consider looking at the muted version of a more vibrant colour, such dusty rose for a hint of pink or light sage for a touch of green.

The wedding colours are for the wedding party, not guests

Unless you're in that bridal party, you'd be best to steer clear of trying to match them. Think of it a bit like a stage show. The actors, in this case the bridal party, all wear the same colour to identify themselves as being in the cast.

Three

Unless you're trying for an ombre or monochromatic scheme, stick to no more than three colours. Use a metallic hue as an accent to pull together your colour scheme. Your wedding will appear like a riot if you bring more than three colours.

Following burgundy, the subsequent most prefered colour was green, and then pale blue. The data we have suggests that bronze will be the wedding colour of least choice in 2021. The percentage of wedlocks in which this vivid hue played a role was surprisingly low (3%).

What hues will best complement your wedding's refined aesthetic? Black, white, and gold are classic colours for a wedding, and they are rarely out of style. However, weddings that lean towards the feminine and sophisticated tend to favour softer hues, such as pink, blush, grey, and purple.

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